Watering Trees and Shrubs


John Wilson

John Wilson

If you had trouble with winterkill or dieback on your trees and shrubs last year, here are some suggestions on how to reduce the problem this year. If you recall, the fall a year ago was much like we are experiencing so far this year. Very little rain which was great for harvest, but not so great for trees, shrubs and perennials in your landscape.

We kind of had the “perfect storm” by having very few storms over winter. Dry soils in the fall followed by little snow cover or moisture melting into the soil caused the dieback that many people experienced last spring.

Well, my crystal ball isn’t good enough to predict what kind of winter we’re going to have, but so far our fall hasn’t put a lot of moisture around the roots of our landscape plants, so it would be a good idea to water young trees, shrubs, and evergreens before the soil freezes. It’s important for trees and shrubs to go through fall and into winter with a moist soil.

Roots do not go dormant as quick as stems and branches. While the tops of plants go dormant or stop growing sometime during fall, roots continue to grow throughout the fall and even into December if soil temperatures allow.

To encourage fall root growth, provide adequate moisture up until the soil freezes. Check the soil around your trees. If the top few inches are dry, moisture is needed. For trees and shrubs, moisten the soil to a depth of eight to 12 inches while taking care not to overwater.

Keep in mind roots are less cold hardy than stems. Roots surrounded by moist soil are less likely to suffer cold temperature injury because moist soil holds more heat than dry soil. Frost penetration is deeper and soil temperatures are colder in sandy or dry soils.

With newly planted trees, cracks in the backfill soil can allow cold air to penetrate to roots, reducing fall root growth and killing new roots. Check for soil cracks and fill these with soil. Providing adequate moisture will prevent soil cracks from forming.

When twigs and stems die in a tree or shrub, we are aware it’s happening. When roots die, we cannot see the dead roots and are not aware roots are dieing. This could be one explanation why one tree establishes quickly while another is slow to establish or dies.

Plants going into winter with adequate fall moisture are also less likely to suffer damage from winter drying. Plant tissue, particularly the green leaves of evergreens, can lose moisture during winter. Most moisture is lost on warm, sunny, and windy winter days.

Moisture lost from plants during winter cannot be replaced by the roots, either because the soil is frozen or because roots do not function at soil temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. This is why fall moisture, either from rain or irrigation, is important.

When woody plants go into winter water stressed, their tissue can be killed by winter drying. This is easy to see on evergreens whose needle tips, or entire branches turn brown in late spring. Some evergreens survive and new growth covers up the damaged growth. Other evergreens are killed by winter dessication.

The leaf and flower buds on deciduous plants, those that drop their leaves, as well as small twigs may be killed by winter dessication. This can result in sparse flowering or leafing. Plants may be forced to produce secondary buds which uses stored food within the plant and may lead to stress.

Keep the soil of trees and shrubs moist up until the soil freezes. Mulch trees and shrubs with a two to four inch layer of wood chip mulch to help conserve soil moisture. Keep the mulch one foot away from the trunk to avoid voles making a home in the mulch and gnawing on the trunk. It’s also important mulch layers are not too deep. Roots that grow into the mulch will be killed by cold winter temperatures, further stressing a tree.

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Flu Risk Much Greater Than Ebola: Wash Your Hands and Get a Flu Shot


By Sara Cameron, RN Oakland Mercy Hospital

Probably most everyone has heard the newest word in the media, one that seems to evoke fear and a little panic in our folks. That word is Ebola. Named for the Ebola River in West Africa, it is a virus that makes one very sick, with fever over 101, severe head and body aches, vomiting and diarrhea, along with hemorrhage in the final stages. It has resulted a death rate of 50% of those who are infected in Africa, where many can’t get treatment.

Ebola was first diagnosed in 1976 in the Congo, but only made news in the US this summer when medical missionaries who contracted the disease in Africa, came to back home to the US for treatment. This virus, as many are, is spread by body fluids like blood, tears, sweat, etc., to another person’s mucous membrane, like eyes, nose, mouth, or an open cut. That is why gloves, mask, eye protection, and gowns are used when caring for these folks.

Many people are wondering why we had to bring folks to the US to treat them. There are only 3 hospitals in Liberia, serving 4.2 million people. That country currently has the worst Ebola outbreak, and most folks can’t get treatment. Liberia is about 2/3 the land size of Nebraska. Our state population is 1.8 million and has over 100 hospitals, one being the Nebraska Medical Center with a specialized bio-containment unit. It is the largest unit of 4 in the country.

Our country really stepped up isolation techniques in response to the 9/11 terror, and the scares of small pox, anthrax and all those nasty viruses resurfacing in the hands of terrorists. Most all hospitals, including our own Oakland Mercy took advantage of purchasing isolation protective equipment, and conduct drills to use it. We have the knowledge and equipment to protect the patient and staff in the Emergency Room.

As you possibly have read, hand washing is the best prevention for this disease. Hand washing is the best defense one has against any disease. Alcohol based hand rubs are generally as effective, unless there is visible soil. Then you need soap and water. Hand washing is the best way to protect yourself against most viruses, in addition to getting a vaccine.

With all the scare about Ebola, it is best to be realistic. Our chances of contracting it in the United States are very slim to none. The virus out there to be concerned with this time of year is the flu. It is estimated that 40,000 will die this year in the US because of the flu and complications. Influenza, or flu is a virus which causes fevers, body aches, cough and congestion.

Flu shots are available now at Oakland Mercy Clinic, Lyons Mercy Clinic, and Tekamah Mercy Clinic, as well as many other places. They are recommended for everyone 6 months and older. Schedule a time to get one.

Do yourself and your loved ones a favor, wash your hands and get a flu shot!

 

 

Hassebrook: Ricketts Has His Head in the Sand


Pete Ricketts has invited New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to Nebraska to campaign for him. Chuck Hassebrook has released the following statement:

“Governor Christie said earlier this week that he is tired of hearing about the minimum wage. So he’s come to Nebraska to hang out with his millionaire buddy, who thinks just like him – they’re two peas in a pod. Pete Ricketts has his head buried in the sand when it comes to the minimum wage. He took millions in executive pay and bonuses, but he would deny Nebraskans that work hard full time every day the opportunity to earn a wage that enables them to put food on the table without public assistance. Thousands of minimum wage workers in Nebraska need a leader who will fight for them, and that’s what I’ll do as Governor.”

Ten Years and Going Strong for Tami Hovendick at Arbonne International


“I never thought 10 years ago I would be where I am today,” stated Tami Hovendick. She is a consultant for Arbonne International, a botanically based skin care and health and wellness company that prides itself for being pure, safe and beneficial.

“I sell skin care, aromatherapy, make-up, baby products, health and wellness and nutrition products,” Tami said.

Choosing to become a consultant for a business is a big step, as it is time-consuming, but can also be very rewarding. “At first it was the premium quality skin care then after referring friends and family to my friend, I decided to jump in,” Tami stated. “I love the people I meet and getting to help them personally and financially.”

Tami decided to become an Arbonne International consultant because it is a consumable product business that equals repeat sales. “It is no different than going to Walmart, Target, etc. One will never say they don’t need anymore shampoo, conditioner, make-up, facial cleaner, etc,” Tami said.

As with any business, getting started takes a great deal of effort. “At first, my sponsor helped me with my shows until I got built up with my own products. Now I pretty much work my business 95% virtual so there is no need for any extra products,” Tami stated. “What I do keep on hand at all times are books and samples for mailings.”

The time it takes to get a business going to where you make a profit varies from one person to another. “It can take as little as six months to make $3,000 to $5,000 per month and the white Mercedes bonus for others takes longer. It depends on how bad you really want it,” Tami said. “No matter what though, those that don’t quit before their time are winners.”

Overall, Tami puts about an hour a day into her business. “This is I work it in the nooks and crannies of my day. I send out a few messages/texts in the morning before I go to work. I may do the same during my lunch,” Tami stated. “Right now, I am communicating with businesses and people from Poland as Arbonne just launched over there on October first. It is a blast trying to translate and understand everyone. They are great people and they are very interested in what we have.

Tami is very much a self-employed person, even as a consultant. It depends on her and her alone to make her business fly and to make a profit. “It is hard to have your own business as you have to be disciplined to keep doing what you do every day no matter what. Working for someone else, well every day you know you will punch a time clock and have that same routine every day,” Tami said. “You know what has to get accomplished in order to keep in good graces with the boss.”

Tami has been fortunate to have the support of her family. “My family is behind me 100%. Just last year, my youngest daughter joined me in this business and then last week my middle daughter decided to jump on board,” Tami stated. “I am very proud of both of them and their decision to come on board with me.”

She has faced many challenges during her 10 years in the business. “The biggest challenge has been getting past myself and to not be an undercover consultant.” Tami said.

She enjoys what she does, and it has been very helpful to her in many other ways. “Because of Arbonne, I not only have great skin and health, but I am more confident, less shy and willing to step out of the box,” Tami stated. “I am so happy and proud to be part of a company that is there for you no matter what. It does not matter what level of success you are at, when we are together in a room, we are one.”

She has met many people over her 10 years, one of whom she won’t soon forget. “I have stood right next to David Cassidy’s wife Sue and talked with her as if she were my neighbor.,” Tami said.

To say that Tami loves her job is an understatement. “I love, love, love what I do. I love that five minutes here and two minutes there can bring in an extra paycheck,” Tami stated. “I would love to share with you more about our company and business.”

 

Tami Hovendick, second from right, and other consultants at and Arbonne convention in Las Vegas. Photo courtesy of Tami Hovendick.

Tami Hovendick, second from right, and other consultants at and Arbonne convention in Las Vegas. Photo courtesy of Tami Hovendick.

Tami, right, and her daughter Jessyca at an Arbonne Convention in Las Vegas. Photo Courtesy of Tami Hovendick.

Tami, right, and her daughter Jessyca at an Arbonne Convention in Las Vegas. Photo Courtesy of Tami Hovendick.

Betty Lou Frye Mossberger Grady, 73, of Tekamah NE


Betty Lou Frye Mossberger Grady, 73 years of Tekamah, Nebraska, passed away Tuesday, October 21, 2014, at Memorial Community Hospital in Blair, Nebraska, with her family by her side.

Betty was born February 23, 1941, in Herman, Nebraska, to Robert A. and Mattie J. (Whitnack) Frye. She attended Herman Schools.

On December 15, 1956, Betty married Richard Mossberger. They had three daughters.

Betty was a hard worker and worked at various types of jobs throughout her life.
She was preceded in death by her parents; sister, Mary A. Snyder; brothers, Robert and Monte Frye.

Survivors include her three daughters, Kathy A. Algiere of Omaha, NE, Robin Mossberger of Tekamah, Mattie Dodge of Omaha; brothers, Harold (Kathleen) Frye of Honey Creek, IA, Stan (Tammy) Frye of Blair, NE; sisters, Alice Gorman of Brookings, OR, Rose (George) Ackerman of Tekamah; nine grandchildren; ten great grandchildren; many nieces, nephews and many friends.

MEMORIAL GATHERING: Friday, October 24, 2014, from 5 – 7 p.m. at Pelan Funeral Home in Tekamah

BURIAL: Herman Cemetery at a later date

MEMORIALS: To the Family

Please feel free to send your condolences to the family.
Each condolence will be printed and given to the family after the service.

pelan@pelanfuneralservices.com

Betty Lou Grady

Betty Lou Grady

Oakland-Craig Wins Big Over Homer


Oakland-Craig took on Homer last Friday evening, easily defeating them with a score of 50-14.

Nick Arlt led the way offensively for the Knights. Photo Credit/Cheri Droescher.

Nick Arlt led the way offensively for the Knights. Photo Credit/Cheri Droescher.

This group of guys watches the game very intently! From left, Rusty Droescher, former head football coach and O-C Principal, David Uhing, Mark Smith and Jay Johnson, all of whom have boys playing on the team. Photo Credit/Cheri Droescher.

This group of guys watches the game very intently! From left, Rusty Droescher, former head football coach and O-C Principal, David Uhing, Mark Smith and Jay Johnson, all of whom have boys playing on the team. Photo Credit/Cheri Droescher.

“We talked about starting fast, and we accomplished that. Our offense was able to put points on the board early and often.  We really challenged our defense to shut down their running game. Their quarterback was 2nd in class C-2 in rushing,” said Coach Joe Anderson. “I thought we played assignment sound football and really rallied to the football and held him to minimal yards.”

Nick Arlt broke a single game rushing record, 16 carries for a total of 362 yards and six touchdowns, and he didn’t play in the second half. Tommy Nelson led defensively, having 16 tackles.

“One of our goals was to win our district, this game allowed us to accomplish that. This week’s game is very important in that a win would give us a home game in the first round of the playoffs,” Joe stated.

The next game is tomorrow night at 7:00 p.m. at Wisner. Go cheer on the Knights!

 

Diabetes Awareness Month


“Make sure to eat lots of fruits and vegetables, see your physician often and drink lots of water,” stated Connie Peterson, recommendations she takes to heart on the subject of type 2 diabetes.

Approximately 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012.

“I got type 2 diabetes when I was pregnant with Cody. They called this gestational diabetes, which I have had since February of 1988,” Connie said. “I take Metformin twice a day and an insulin shot called Humalog before each meal. I also take an insulin shot called lantus before bedtime. This is a slow acting shot to help me throughout the night.”

Connie is on a sliding scale. “This is according to what your sugars run when checked before each meal. I check mine four times a day. Each persons’ sugars run differently,” Connie stated. 85 makes me feel low, which consists of shakiness and feeling jittery. 170 is high for me, which may make me extra thirsty or sleepy. Some have to urinate a lot.”

Sugars used to be the only thing people really watched, but that is no longer true. “Now you need to count carbohydrates, 45 grams for breakfast, 15 grams for a snack, 45 grams for lunch, 15 for a snack, 45 grams for supper and 15 for a snack before going to bed,” Connie said. “The one before bed is only if you need it.”

There is another measures recommended to control diabetes. “Exercise is very important. Walking is especially good,” Connie said.

As time has progressed, Connie has had to deal with many health changes as a result of her diabetes. “At this time in my life, I am dealing with a lot of pain in my feet, toes and legs. This is called neuropathy,” Connie stated. Her family has a history of diabetes. “My dad was a diabetic. He had a large family and I believe every one of them had it in some form or other,” Connie said. “I had an aunt that went blind and had several other problems. My brother and sister also have been diagnosed with diabetes.”

People with diabetes are at a higher risk of major health complications. “There are horrible side effects from having diabetes. Loss of limbs, blindness and diabetic ulcers are a few,” Connie stated.

Monitoring your health is very important to prevent diabetes from deteriorating your health. “I have blood your done every three months. You need to see your physician regularly, more often if there are complications,” Connie said.

For more information about diabetes, contact your physician or visit the National Diabetes Prevention Program at www.cdc.gov/diabetes.

Connie with her granddaughter Kalihan. Photo Courtesy of Connie Peterson.

Connie with her granddaughter Kalihan. Photo Courtesy of Connie Peterson.

Crafts and Story time at Lyons Public Library


This group of kids had a great time at the library making a farmer and hearing a story. All photos credit of Denise Gilliland, Editor and Chief, Kat Country Hub.

This group of kids had a great time at the library making a farmer and hearing a story. All photos credit of Denise Gilliland, Editor and Chief, Kat Country Hub.

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Fire Prevention Week Posters Made by LDNE Elementary


LDNE elementary students made posters recognizing fire prevention week and checking smoke alarms. All photos credit of Denise Gilliland, Editor and Chief, Kat Country Hub.

LDNE elementary students made posters recognizing fire prevention week and checking smoke alarms. All photos credit of Denise Gilliland, Editor and Chief, Kat Country Hub.

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Virgil D. Sutton, 95, of Tekamah NE


VIRGIL D. SUTTON, 95 years of Tekamah, Nebraska, passed away Monday, October 20, 2014, at the Golden Living Center in Tekamah.

No services are scheduled

MEMORIALS: To the Family

Please feel free to send your condolences to the family.
Each condolence will be printed and given to the family after the service.

pelan@pelanfuneralservices.com

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