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4-H/FFA Livestock Quality Assurance Training


Keeping livestock properly watered takes a lot of water and effort if you are carrying it to your animals as these Burt County 4-H members learned. They are pictured with at least part of the buckets they would have to carry to the animal they were assigned as part of the Livestock Quality Assurance Training last Sunday evening in Oakland. Pictured are: Bailey Fleischman of Tekamah showing part of the 23 gallons of water a 1150 lb. steer would need at 90 degrees; Bryce Uhing of West Point with enough water for a 700 lb steer at 50 degrees; Thomas Hennig of Tekamah with the 6 gallons of water he’d need for a 200 pound hog at 100 degrees; Megan Olson of Tekamah with the much smaller amount she’d need for a 40 lb. lamb at 50 degrees; Blaine Olson of Tekamah with water for his 120 lb. lamb at 80 degrees and Sydney Olsen of Lyons with enough water for a 120 lb. pig at 50 degrees. The rule of thumb in calculating water use is one gallon per 100 lbs. of animal plus more for heat and stress situations.  Photo Credit/Mary Loftis

Keeping livestock properly watered takes a lot of water and effort if you are carrying it to your animals as these Burt County 4-H members learned. They are pictured with at least part of the buckets they would have to carry to the animal they were assigned as part of the Livestock Quality Assurance Training last Sunday evening in Oakland. Pictured are: Bailey Fleischman of Tekamah showing part of the 23 gallons of water a 1150 lb. steer would need at 90 degrees; Bryce Uhing of West Point with enough water for a 700 lb steer at 50 degrees; Thomas Hennig of Tekamah with the 6 gallons of water he’d need for a 200 pound hog at 100 degrees; Megan Olson of Tekamah with the much smaller amount she’d need for a 40 lb. lamb at 50 degrees; Blaine Olson of Tekamah with water for his 120 lb. lamb at 80 degrees and Sydney Olsen of Lyons with enough water for a 120 lb. pig at 50 degrees. The rule of thumb in calculating water use is one gallon per 100 lbs. of animal plus more for heat and stress situations.
Photo Credit/Mary Loftis

4-H/FFA Livestock Quality Assurance Training included a session on the importance of reading medication labels. This lesson was emphasized by having the participants try to identify what was in the beverage bottles by using the information available on the bottle and tasting and smelling the liquids. These Logan Valley Clovers 4-H members resort to tasting the liquids as the labeling was often incomplete. Hailey Miller of Lyons; Lyndsey Johnson of Oakland, Brent Miller of Lyons (behind); Elise Anderson of Lyons and Avery Bacon of Lyons take turns trying the different beverages as Tess Johnson of Oakland helped serve them. Photo Credit/Mary Loftis.

4-H/FFA Livestock Quality Assurance Training included a session on the importance of reading medication labels. This lesson was emphasized by having the participants try to identify what was in the beverage bottles by using the information available on the bottle and tasting and smelling the liquids. These Logan Valley Clovers 4-H members resort to tasting the liquids as the labeling was often incomplete. Hailey Miller of Lyons; Lyndsey Johnson of Oakland, Brent Miller of Lyons (behind); Elise Anderson of Lyons and Avery Bacon of Lyons take turns trying the different beverages as Tess Johnson of Oakland helped serve them. Photo Credit/Mary Loftis.

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About katcountryhub
I am a graduate of Northeast Community College with a degree in journalism. I am married to Jeff Gilliland. We have two grown children, Justin and Whitney and four grandchildren, Grayce, Grayhm, Charli and Penelope. I will be covering Lyons, Decatur, Bancroft and Rosalie and am hoping to expand my horizons as time progresses!

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