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Don’t Spread Weed Seed at Harvest


News Column

John Wilson

Extension Educator

October 4, 2018

 

Don’t Spread Weed Seed at Harvest

Now that fall is here and crops are mature, it’s easy to see weed escapes that might not have been as visible last summer. Some precautions at harvest can reduce weed seed being moved from one field to another. This will help reduce the weed control challenges next growing season.

An Ounce of Prevention is Greater than 150 Pounds of Unwanted Biomaterial

Combines are one of the largest and most impressive machines on a farm. These large machines effectively remove crops from fields and separate grain from other material to be spread back in the field. Following harvest of an individual field, combines retain significant plant material.

As much as 150 pounds of biomaterial is retained, including chaff, grain, and weed seed. This material may remain in tight spaces within the machine or in obvious places, such as the gathering head and grain tank. While it is impossible to remove all material from a combine, efforts following the harvest of fields can be valuable in reducing movement of weed seed and other material from one field to another.

Most farmers can point to fields with specific problems that other fields do not have, such as marestail, Palmer amaranth, or other difficult-to-manage weeds including herbicide-resistant weeds. Sanitation and appropriate combine clean-out when harvesting these fields should be a top priority to prevent spreading the problem to other fields.

Priorities to Prevent Spreading Weed Seed

To reduce the movement of weed seed from one field to another, farmers should take care to do three steps, whenever possible:

  1. Remove problem weeds prior to harvest to prevent contamination of the combine,
  2. Consider harvest order to prevent carrying seed of problem weeds to currently clean fields, and
  3. Practice good clean-out procedures prior to moving to clean fields.

Combine Clean-out Essentials

Cleaning out the combine prior to moving from one field to another may not be practical in all cases but is an essential step to limit the potential for weed problems moving from one field to another during harvest. A full clean-out may be impractical due to the time constraints of cleaning the complex interior of a combine. However, farmers should focus on priority areas where significant material may remain and be knocked loose in following fields.

20-30 Minute Cleaning Steps

Whether you operate a red, green, or yellow combine, a brief 20 to 30 minute cleaning will remove much of the material that may easily come loose in other fields. Steps in this cleaning procedure should include:

  1. Run the unloading auger empty for at least one minute.
  2. Open the clean grain and tailings elevator doors, rock trap, and unloading auger sump. (Optional: Remove the header from the combine prior to self-cleaning.)
  3. Start the combine and separator.
  4. Adjust the cleaning shoe fan to full speed for maximum airflow and alternately open and close cleaning shoe sieves electronically, or
  5. Adjust rotor to full speed for maximum air suction and alternately open and close the concaves.
  6. Operate the combine this way for at least two minutes for self-cleaning (Optional: Drive over end rows or rough terrain to dislodge material during operation.)
  7. Clean any material left in the rock trap.
  8. Use a leaf blower or air compressor to remove material from exterior of the combine, focusing on the head, feederhouse, and axle and straw spreader at the rear of the machine.
  9. Remember to close the doors to the rock trap, clean the grain elevator, and the unloading auger sump.

Summary

This clean-out procedure will not reduce the importance of practicing weed control tactics like removing weeds prior to harvest or choosing harvest order to prevent cross-contamination of fields. It will reduce movement of material and weed seed to fields harvested later in the season. At the end of the harvest season, a full combine clean-out should be completed for maintenance of the machine.

This information was taken from HARVEST HELPLINE: COMBINE CLEAN-OUT prepared by the North Central Agriculture and Natural Resources Academy. (December 2017).

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Happenings at Oakland Heights


Oakland Heights News by Nancy Silvey

This week on Wednesday December 6th the Bell Choir will be performing at 2:30 pm. Then on Friday December 8th is the residents Christmas party, with dinner starting at 6:00 pm followed by entertainment with Wayne Miller and Santa Claus. Then on Saturday December 9th at 3:00 pm in the Nursing Home dining room the UFF Drama Association, Young players with be putting on a play called “The Christmas Train. Next week on Thursday December 14th Charlie Davis will be here to play the Harmonica. On Friday December 15th is Happy Hour starting at 2:30 pm, and on Saturday December 16th the Rusty Buckets will be here at 2:30 pm.

Church Service for Sunday December 10th will be given by Craig/Alder Grove Church at 2:30 pm with a luncheon following service. On Tuesday December 12th is Catholic Mass at 9:30 am given by Father Paul.

Activities for the week of December 4th   to December 9th   are as follows, reading with Suzanne, Manicures, Reminiscing Group, Sing A Long, Game Day,  Bingo the w/Evang. Free ,  Bible fellowship,   Let’s Play Ball , Crafty Cooking, Saturday Video,   and Lawrence Walk.

Volunteers signing in last week were; Suzanne Sanderson, Cover McCauley, Judy Nelson, Dani Moseman, Anne Anderson, Mary Donavon,   Marge Maller, Patty Miller, Candice Fehrer, , Bonnie Fleischman, Kristen Johnson, Monroe Johnson, Sandra Johnson, Nadine Anderson, Sue Beckner, Tom Johnso, and Makayla Johnson.

Guest signing the guest book last week was; Mary Stuenkel and Brain Goracke to see Jene Hightree. Tom and Mary Plageman to see Dorothy Larson.

 

 

 

 

Caregiver Support Group Meeting


The monthly Caregiver Support Group will meet Dec. 11 at 1:00 p.m. at the Bancroft Senior Center.

This will be our Christmas party; a light lunch will be served with the caregivers being asked to bring dessert items or other types of munchies.

All caregivers are invited to come and enjoy the afternoon with us. Informational topics are presented and thoughts are shared on how to keep the people we care for comfortable and safe.

 

 

News From Bancroft Senior Center


Bancroft Senior Center News by Connie Bargmann

If you are 60+ and need information on programs designed to help keep you stay in your home longer or if you need legal help, contact Connie at 402-648-3387 or in the evening at 402-648-7648. There are no membership fees or attendance requirements and new faces are always welcome.

* We have the following medical equipment to loan out on an as need basis, wheel chair, bath seats, toilet seat riser and portable toilet chair, crutches or walkers. Call 402-648-3387 during office hours.

Meals on Wheels

 

Weekly Activities:

Wed. Dec. 6: Chime practice today at 9:00 a.m. Coffee time at 10:00 a.m. Sign up to play in the pitch tournament at 1:30 p.m.

Thurs. Dec. 7: Tai chi class at 9:30 a.m. Join us for coffee at 10:00 a.m. Come and play the golf game at 1:30 a.m. Remember to sign up for tomorrow’s dinner.

Fri. Dec. 8: Stop in for coffee. The meal for today is meatloaf, potatoes, veggie and dessert. Cards will be played at 1:30 p.m.

Mon. Dec. 11: Join us for coffee. The caregiver support group meets at 1:00 for a light lunch and then the meeting at 2:00 p.m.

Tues. Dec. 12: Tai Chi Class at 9:30 a.m. Coffee time is at 10:00 p.m. Sign up to play hand & foot at 1:30 p.m.

Wed. Dec.13: No chime practice today. Coffee time at 10:00 a.m. Come and play Ski-Bo at 1:30 p.m.

 

Meals on Wheels

Getting tired of cooking for one person and then have left over’s that you will be eating for the next couple of days? Why don’t you consider getting meals on wheels; the meals are very nutritious and provide you with the protein, fruits and vegetables needed for a well balanced meal. Contact the manager at the Bancroft Senior Center if you have more questions or want to sign up; the number is 402-648-3387. We are getting very short on people willing to deliver the meals,won’t you think about volunteering 3 or 4 hours a month for this worthwhile program.

What Are You Thankful For?


Today, and every day, I am thankful for this little ray of sunshine, Penelope. We will be celebrating her 3rd birthday today.

And, a year ago tomorrow, we found out she was going to have a baby brother! Another ray of sunshine, Rowen!

Our precious grandkids, Rowen, 6 months, and Penelope, very close to 3 years old. Nene and Papa can’t wait to see you soon! We are going to celebrate Peeps 3rd birthday!

God Bless Penelope and Rowen.

Nene and Papa can’t wait to see you!

 

Waffle Supper at Oakland Heights


Oakland Heights will be hosting a waffle supper Thursday, November 16th at 5:30 p.m. Stop in and enjoy a delicious meal!

Happenings at Oakland Heights


Oakland Heights News by Nancy Silvey

This next week is the monthly Waffle Supper at 5:30 pm on Thursday November 16th, and on Saturday November 18th the Rusty Buckets will be here to perform at 2:30 pm. Next week on Wednesday November 22nd at 2:30 pm  is our Thanksgiving service given by First Lutheran Church. On Thursday November 23rd is Thanksgiving and the residents will be having a tradition Thanksgiving Day Dinner starting at 11:30 am. On Friday is the Nebraska Football game starting at 3:00 pm.

Church Service for Sunday November 19th  will be given by the Evangelical Free Church at 2:30 pm with a luncheon following service.

Activities for the week of November 20th  to November 25th    are as follows, reading with Suzanne, Manicures, Sing A Long, Game Day,  Bingo the w/Staff, Mike Barger,  Bell choir practice, Saturday Video, Nebraska Football, and Lawrence Walk.

Volunteers signing in last week were; Suzanne Sanderson, Cover McCauley, Judy Nelson, Dani Moseman, Anne Anderson, Mary Donavon, Betty Hanna, Marge Maller, Patty Miller, Bonnie Fleischman, Kristen Johnson, Monroe Johnson, Lola Bridgeford, Nadine Anderson, Sue Beckner, and Makayla Johnson.

Guest signing the guest book last week was; Mary Stuenkel and Brain Goracke to see Jene Hightree. Tom and Mary Plageman to see Dorothy Larson.

 

 

 

Caregiver Support Group to Meet at Bancroft Senior Center


The monthly Caregiver Support Group will meet November 20 at the Bancroft Senior Center at 2:00 p.m.

All caregivers are invited to come and enjoy the afternoon with us.

Informational topics are presented and thoughts are shared on how to keep the people we care for comfortable and happy.

News From Bancroft Senior Center


If you are 60+ and need information on programs designed to help keep you stay in your home longer or if you need legal help, contact Connie at 402-648-3387 or in the evening at 402-648-7648. There are no membership fees or attendance requirements and new faces are always welcome.

* We have the following medical equipment to loan out on an as need basis, wheel chair, bath seats, toilet seat riser and portable toilet chair, crutches or walkers. Call 402-648-3387 during office hours.

Meals on Wheels

 

Weekly Activities:

Wed. Nov. 15: Chime group practices at 9:00 a.m. Coffee time at 10:00 a.m. FROG Ex. at 1:30 p.m. We will play bingo at 2:00 p.m.

Thurs. Nov. 16: Tai Chi Class at 9:30 a.m. Coffee time is at 10:00 a.m. Sign up to play 5-handed pinochle at 1:30 p.m. Make your reservation for the noon meal on Tuesday, November 21 Friday.

Fri. Nov. 17: Come in for coffee. Join us for the birthday party in the afternoon; we’ll play pitch and hand & foot. There will be a speaker at 1:30 p.m. Come and eat lunch with us at 3:30 p.m.

Mon. Nov. 20: Join us for coffee. The caregiver group meets at 2:00 p.m.

Nov. 21: Tai Chi Class at 9:30 a.m. Coffee time is at 10:00 p.m. The noon meal will be pancakes and French toast, scrambled eggs, sausage, fruit cup, juice and coffee. Cards will be played in the afternoon.

Wed. Nov. 22: No chime practice today.  Coffee time at 9:00 a.m. FROG Ex. at 1:00 p.m. Play Skip-Bo at 1:30 p.m.

 

Meals on Wheels

Getting tired of cooking for one person and then have left over’s that you will be eating for the next couple of days? Why don’t you consider getting meals on wheels; the meals are very nutritious and provide you with the protein, fruits and vegetables needed for a well balanced meal. Contact the manager at the Bancroft Senior Center if you have more questions or want to sign up; the number is 402-648-3387.

This Day in History: Moby Dick was Published


On this day in 1851, Moby-Dick, a novel by Herman Melville about the voyage of the whaling ship Pequod, is published by Harper & Brothers in New York. Moby-Dick is now considered a great classic of American literature and contains one of the most famous opening lines in fiction: “Call me Ishmael.” Initially, though, the book about Captain Ahab and his quest for a giant white whale was a flop.

Herman Melville was born in New York City in 1819 and as a young man spent time in the merchant marines, the U.S. Navy and on a whaling ship in the South Seas. In 1846, he published his first novel, Typee, a romantic adventure based on his experiences in Polynesia. The book was a success and a sequel, Omoo, was published in 1847. Three more novels followed, with mixed critical and commercial results. Melville’s sixth book, Moby-Dick, was first published in October 1851 in London, in three volumes titled The Whale, and then in the U.S. a month later. Melville had promised his publisher an adventure story similar to his popular earlier works, but instead, Moby-Dick was a tragic epic, influenced in part by Melville’s friend and Pittsfield, Massachusetts, neighbor, Nathaniel Hawthorne, whose novels include The Scarlet Letter.

After Moby-Dick‘s disappointing reception, Melville continued to produce novels, short stories (Bartleby) and poetry, but writing wasn’t paying the bills so in 1865 he returned to New York to work as a customs inspector, a job he held for 20 years.

Melville died in 1891, largely forgotten by the literary world. By the 1920s, scholars had rediscovered his work, particularly Moby-Dick, which would eventually become a staple of high school reading lists across the United States. Billy Budd, Melville’s final novel, was published in 1924, 33 years after his death.

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