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River City Roundup Rides Into Oakland


River City Roundup riders travel to Oakland, heading to the park to camp. All photos credit of Denise Gilliland/Editor and Chief, Kat Country Hub.

River City Roundup riders travel to Oakland, heading to the park to camp. All photos credit of Denise Gilliland/Editor and Chief, Kat Country Hub.

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This Day in History


AMERICAN REVOLUTION

1781

Battle of Yorktown begins »

AUTOMOTIVE

1938

Auto inventor Charles Duryea dies »

CIVIL WAR

1863

Union generals blamed for Chickamauga defeat »

COLD WAR

1959

Khrushchev and Eisenhower offer views on summit meeting »

CRIME

1988

A cult leader kills one of his followers »

DISASTER

1918

Flu epidemic hits Philadelphia »

GENERAL INTEREST

48

Pompey the Great assassinated »

1066

William the Conqueror invades England »

1542

Cabrillo encounters California »

1989

Marcos dies in exile »

1994

Estonia sinks »

HOLLYWOOD

1901

TV host Ed Sullivan born »

LITERARY

1634

John Milton’s drama, Comus, performed »

MUSIC

1991

Miles Davis dies »

OLD WEST

1542

Cabrillo discovers San Diego Bay »

PRESIDENTIAL

1967

President Johnson honors American soldier »

SPORTS

1960

Ted Williams hits home run in last major league at-bat »

VIETNAM WAR

1968

Battle for Thuong Duc begins »

1972

Weekly casualty figures contain no U.S. fatalities »

WORLD WAR I

1918

British soldier allegedly spares the life of an injured Adolf Hitler »

WORLD WAR II

1942

General Arnold fights for unique bombers 

Delores R. Carlson, 87, of Oakland NE


Delores R. Carlson was born January 27, 1929, at Crellin Hospital in Lyons, Nebraska, to Charlie and Emma (Lange) Swanson, the youngest of seven daughters. She passed away Friday, September 23, 2016, at Oakland Heights in Oakland.

Delores was baptized and confirmed at Memorial United Methodist Church in Lyons. She attended Jefferson Country School and Lyons High School.

On June 24, 1949, she married Erwin W. Carlson. To this union six children were born, one son and five daughters. They made their home in the Lyons and Oakland area. She was a member of the First Evangelical Lutheran Church in Oakland. Delores was a loving wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She was employed by Dorothy Magnussen at Wee Care Day Care Center for 24 years.

Delores moved to Maplewood apartments in 1994 and to Oakland Heights in 2011. She was a ten-year cancer survivor.

Delores enjoyed many things including reading and collecting cookbooks, bird watching, having coffee with friends and family, the Food Network, and most of all her grandchildren and great grandchildren. She touched many people with her kind and gentle ways.

She was preceded in death by her husband Erwin in 1991; daughter, Carol Camron in 1998; two grandsons, Nathan Camron and Scott Peterson, her parents and sisters, Ethel Beck, Regina Russman, Iona Swanson, Leora Russman, Phyllis Brecher and Audrey Frank.

Survivors include her son, Douglas (Judy) of Gretna, NE; daughters, Deanna “Dee” (Donald) Knobbe of West Point, NE, Connie (Russell) Peterson of Oakland, Valerie (Brian) Baker of Wakefield, NE, Fay (Chris) Schinck of Omaha, NE; fourteen grandchildren; sixteen great grandchildren; many nieces, nephews and a host of friends.

Visitation is Mon., Sept. 26th from 5:00-8:00 p.m. at Pelan Funeral Services in Oakland. Family will be receiving friends from 5:00-7:00 p.m. Visitation will also be held one hour prior to the funeral.

The funeral will be Tues., Sept. 27th at 10:30 a.m. at the First Evangelical Lutheran Church in Oakland.

Burial is in the Oakland Cemetery.

Memorials suggested to the family for designation at a later time.

Delores Carlson

Delores Carlson

Happenings at Oakland Heights


Oakland Heights News by Nancy Silvey

Monday September 26th is our monthly Resident Council meeting at 2:30 pm. Then on Thursday September 29th is the General Store for the residents to do a little shopping it will be from 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm. We have one resident celebrating a Birthday, Dale Johnson on September 24th.

Church Service for Sunday September 25th will be given by First Methodist Church at 2:30 pm with a luncheon following. On Tuesday September 27th at 9:30 am is Catholic Mass with Father Paul.

Activities for the week of Sept 26th to Oct. 1st are as follows, Reading with Jill, Manicures, Sing a Long, Game Day, Bingo the w/Staff, Reading Group, Bible Fellowship, Let’s Play Ball, Crafty Cooking, Friday Bingo, Saturday morning video, and Lawrence Walk.

Volunteers signing in last week were; Judy Nelson, Betty Hanna, Mary Donavan, Anne Anderson, Marge Maller, Bonnie Fleischman, Di Ruwe, Dani Moseman, Nadine Anderson, Lucille Fleischman, and Sly Rouse.

 

 

 

Growing Trade with Japan


By Governor Pete Ricketts

Trade has helped grow Nebraska for decades.  Whether you are a rancher who exports beef to Japan or a center pivot manufacturer who has expanded your operations to China, trade has been critical to growing our Nebraska farms, ranches, and businesses.  Just look at the numbers: In 2014, Nebraska exported a total of $10.66 billion worth of goods, of which $6.59 billion worth was ag-based.  Whatever pessimism we hear about trade from politicians these days, it is critical that we remember how key our trade relationships are to growing opportunities for the next generation of Nebraskans.  

 

To see how trade has benefitted our state, there’s no better example than our relationship with Japan.  Since Kawasaki first put down roots in Lincoln in 1974, Nebraska’s trade relationship with Japan has been helping create jobs and growing our economy.  Our long-standing relationship with Japan has made the country the state’s number one direct foreign investor and third largest trading partner. 

 

This relationship has flourished because of a long-term commitment by numerous Nebraska diplomats including previous governors and business leaders.  My administration has continued this tradition.  In 2015, I led my first trade mission to Asia during which I met with executives from Japanese companies to thank them for their investment in Nebraska and to talk about how we could support future expansions.

 

The trade mission has borne fruit.  Over the past year, Kawasaki announced it would establish its first North American aerostructures line in Lincoln with a multi-million dollar investment.  Morio Denki, one of Kawasaki’s suppliers that produces electrical components for rail cars, also announced their expansion in Nebraska.  In addition to these expansions, we have also seen recent investments from other Japanese companies including Marubeni, Kewpie, Itochu, and NTT.

 

Continuing to cultivate relationships with Japanese companies can help encourage additional investment and build Nebraska’s reputation as a great place to do business.  Last week, I traveled to St. Louis to attend the 48th Annual Midwest U.S.-Japan Conference.   At the event, I addressed the conference and met with Japanese business executives as well as the country’s ambassador to the United States.  During my address, I announced that Nebraska would host the association in Omaha for its 50th annual conference in 2018.  The event will be a once-in-a-generation opportunity for Nebraska to showcase our state as a great place to do business for Japanese business executives and leaders looking for opportunities to invest and grow their businesses.

 

While relationship building through trade missions is key to expanding trade opportunities for Nebraska, we must also work to break down trade barriers that are limiting growth in markets for our products.  Right now, Congress is considering the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade deal that would help expand markets for Nebraska’s commodities along the Pacific Rim with countries like Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, and Australia among others.  The deal would reduce trade barriers, such as tariffs on our commodities like beef, making our products much more attractive to millions of consumers.  For example, it would take Japan’s 38 percent tariff on our beef down to nine percent, and in Vietnam it would go from 20 percent to zero!

 

Trade deals like TPP are good for growing Nebraska and our relationship with key trade partners like Japan.  As Congress continues to consider TPP, I encourage you to contact your congressman and senators.  You can find all their information by visiting house.gov or senate.gov.  If you have feedback for my office, I hope you will contact me by emailing pete.ricketts@nebraska.gov or by calling 402-471-2244.

Governor Ricketts Statement on Blue Cross Blue Shield Exit from ACA Marketplace


Governor Pete Ricketts issued a statement following an announcement by Blue Cross Blue Shield that the company would exit the Affordable Care Act marketplace in Nebraska.

 

“This is further evidence that the Affordable Care Act was bad policy.  When solid companies like Blue Cross Blue Shield pull out of the market, something is structurally wrong with the system.”

Fischer Statement on Blue Cross Departure


WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Deb Fischer (R-Neb.) released the following statement following reports that Blue Cross Blue Shield will drop out of the ObamaCare marketplace in Nebraska:

 

“The failures of ObamaCare are self-evident. Nebraska families continue to be hurt by this failed law with higher costs and fewer choices. It simply does not work, and it is collapsing under its own weight.”

 

Deer Permits Available in all Units


Haven’t picked up a deer hunting permit yet? There’s still time — permits are available in all units. With long seasons, over-the-counter permits, lots of public access, the ability to hunt the rut, and high-quality mule and white tail deer available, it’s no wonder that hunters report having a great experience in Nebraska year after year.

In 2015, mule deer buck harvest increased 18 percent, and the whitetail buck harvest climbed 14 percent. Our deer hunting page has all the information you need to plan a satisfying, successful hunt. Buy your permit today!

Nebraska One of Best Places to Hunt Pheasants


This week, Pheasants Forever named Nebraska as one of the top eight pheasant hunting destinations in the United States.

“The Cornhusker State is a bird hunting cornucopia,” Ron Spomer writes. “You’re liable to bump into not just ringnecks, but bobwhites, sharp-tailed grouse and prairie chickens. And you can look for them on 800,000 public access acres on 300 state and federal land areas. That’s only 2 percent of the state’s total land, so if you can talk yourself onto private lands, you’ll have the potential to walk yourself to death in a flurry of upland hunting.” 

Fall pheasant hunters can look forward to an excellent season. Surveys show that bird numbers continue to be robust, and that conditions for upland birds are better than in recent years. In addition, Nebraska Game and Parks recently unveiled the Berggren Plan for Pheasants, an ambitious and innovative five-year plan to improve pheasant populations across the state.

For tips on where to hunt pheasants and how to plan your trip, visit us online. You can also buy a permit on our website.

This Day in History


AMERICAN REVOLUTION

1776

Congress elects agents to negotiate treaty with France »

AUTOMOTIVE

1928

First day of work at the Galvin Manufacturing Corporation »

CIVIL WAR

1864

Rebels begin attack against Fort Davidson, Missouri »

COLD WAR

1989

Anti-censorship law approved by Soviet legislature »

CRIME

2007

Mistrial declared in Phil Spector murder case »

DISASTER

2002

Ferry sinks off Gambian coast »

GENERAL INTEREST

1580

Drake circumnavigates the globe »

1957

Bernstein’s West Side Story opens »

1996

Shannon Lucid returns to Earth »

HOLLYWOOD

1969

The Brady Bunch premieres »

2008

Screen legend Paul Newman dies »

LITERARY

1888

T.S. Eliot is born »

MUSIC

1957

West Side Story premieres on Broadway »

OLD WEST

1820

The famous frontiersman Daniel Boone dies in Missouri »

PRESIDENTIAL

1960

Kennedy and Nixon square off in a televised presidential debate »

SPORTS

1971

Four 20-game winners »

VIETNAM WAR

1945

First American soldier killed in Vietnam »

1969

Nixon responds to critics »

WORLD WAR I

1918

Meuse-Argonne offensive opens »

WORLD WAR II

1944

Allies slaughtered by Germans in Arnhem »

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