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A New Federal Judge for Nebraska


By U.S. Senator Deb Fischer

Ninety to nothing. It’s a rare moment when the U.S. Senate votes unanimously to approve a judicial nominee. I am proud that it did so for the confirmation of Omaha attorney Bob Rossiter to serve on the federal bench in Nebraska.

 

Bob’s confirmation was the result of a long, careful search. The U.S. District Court for the District of Nebraska has a proud tradition of fairness and justice. It is an example of efficiency and integrity. The court also has a small bench, but a heavy docket. So when Judge Bataillon announced he would be taking senior status, I immediately began working with former Senator Mike Johanns to find the most qualified replacement to fill his seat.

 

Through an open process, we considered many applicants, all of whom had excellent credentials. Each applicant filled out the lengthy questionnaire from the Senate Judiciary Committee, and, after careful review, we interviewed a half-dozen finalists. While it was clear Nebraska has no shortage of sharp, principled legal minds, Bob Rossiter stood out.

 

After this extensive and thorough search, Senator Johanns and I recommended Bob to the president in August 2014. Following our recommendation, President Obama formally nominated Mr. Rossiter on June 11, 2015, initiating his confirmation process in the United States Senate. Last fall, Bob traveled to Washington, D.C. and testified before the Judiciary Committee. I was honored to join Bob and testify on his behalf at the hearing. The committee approved his nomination, which set the stage for a final vote on the Senate floor.

 

This process may sound lengthy, but Bob’s nomination was for a lifetime appointment. It took time for Senator Johanns and me to select the most qualified person to recommend to the president. It took the White House time to vet Bob’s credentials. It took the Judiciary Committee time to review his experience and qualifications. Throughout each step, Bob demonstrated he was the right person for this job.

Bob Rossiter graduated cum laude from Creighton University School of Law and clerked for U.S. District Court Judge C. Arlen Beam on Nebraska’s federal district court. He became a partner at the law firm of Fraser Stryker in Omaha where he handled a wide range of important issues with excellence. Bob worked hard and earned the respect of his colleagues at each stage of his impressive career. This is perhaps the strongest testament to his talent and integrity, and because of this, he was elected to serve as president of the Nebraska Bar Association.

 

When the Senate voted unanimously to confirm Bob last month, it also endorsed his character. That character is fundamentally Nebraskan. It is one of integrity, commitment to the rule of law, and hard work. Nebraskans are known for this all around the world. And, last week, members from across the political spectrum voted for it in the Senate.

 

I know Bob will make significant contributions to Nebraska’s federal bench in the years to come. The U.S. Senate has recognized his great merit and met Nebraska’s great need.

 

Thank you for participating in the democratic process. I look forward to visiting with you again next week.

U.S. Senator Deb Fischer

U.S. Senator Deb Fischer

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About katcountryhub
I am a graduate of Northeast Community College with a degree in journalism. I am married to Jeff Gilliland. We have two grown children, Justin and Whitney and four grandchildren, Grayce, Grayhm, Charli and Penelope. I will be covering Lyons, Decatur, Bancroft and Rosalie and am hoping to expand my horizons as time progresses!

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