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Ditch Diets Forever with Mindful Eating


By Mary Loftis, Extension Assistant

Dieting is a multi-billion dollar market.  Even if you don’t think that you need to lose weight, you may be swayed by the plethora of magazine stories devoted to weight loss to the TV shows highlighting biggest weight loss or losers. But the problem with dieting is that it can promote an obsession with food and weight, feelings of failure, guilt and deprivation.  This can lead to a endless cycle of dieting, throwing in the towel and eating anything, dieting again and so on.  If you want to lose weight but would rather ditch diets forever, it may be time to try mindful eating.

 

The same is true for people with diabetes where self-management of the disease can lead to frustrations and feelings of wanting to throw in the towel and just eat whatever makes you feel good at that point.  You may find that the environment in your home is also causing temptations to eat too much or eat foods that may cause issues for your blood sugar control.

 

Mindful eating teaches you that food is nourishment and eating should be enjoyed but we shouldn’t use food to cope with life’s stressors.  Some have called food a cheap emotional cure-all. If you are feeling anxious or stressed chomping your way through a bag of chips may temporarily decrease your anxiety, or if you are bored and lonely, you might turn to food for comfort.

 

How do you start eating mindfully?  How do you make you home and eating habits slim by design?  Join us for the March 14 session of Control Diabetes for Life to learn how mindful eating and slim by design can be key in your efforts of self-management of diabetes.

 

Whether you have just been diagnosed with diabetes, have had diabetes for many years, or are a family member or friend intent on learning as much as you can about the serious disease of diabetes and its life threatening complications we invite you to participate in the March 14 session of “Control of Diabetes for Life”. The theme for the March session is Ready, Set, Go! Diabetes Self-Management a New Look.

 

“Control Your Diabetes for Life” is a program that will help you take charge of your life and learn to control diabetes and get up-to-date information related to controlling diabetes.  The program will take place on Monday, March 14. Through the two-way interactive distance education you will have the opportunity to discuss questions you have with the teaching team of Stacie Petersen, B.S.N. and Certified Diabetes Educator; Deborah Willcox, R.D.,L.M.N.T., of Franciscan Care Services in West Point; and Debra Schroeder, UNL Extension Educator in Cuming County.  Guest speaker for this session will be Terry Nelson, D.P.T., also with Franciscan Care Services.

 

Topics included during the March 14 session are: “Nutrition for Your Eyes”, “Are You Sitting Too Much?”, “What’s New for Diabetes Self-Management”, and “Is Your Home Slim by Design?”

Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions of the presenters. Recipes for diabetic appropriate foods will be shared to help you with food management goals.

 

Participants have the opportunity to attend from 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Tekamah Herman Public High School.

 

Participants are asked to pre-register for Control Diabetes for Life by calling the Nebraska Extension Office in Burt County 402/374-2929. Please register by Friday, March 12, so the proper number of handouts may be prepared. School food service staff may earn two hours of continuing education credit for attending.

This program is offered free-of-charge by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension, Franciscan Care Service of West Point and the schools hosting the presentation. These sessions are designed to supplement the education that you receive from your local diabetes education team and not a substitute for diabetes classes through your local health care providers.

Control your diabetes for life!  Start by attending the March 14 distance education program.  Call 402-374-2929 today to register!

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Peer Power Important in Diabetes Self-Management


Realizing that you are not alone in the coping with management of diabetes is an important component in the successful control of blood glucose levels.  Knowing that others have the day-to-day challenges that you experience is an important component to diabetes self-management.  It can be that extra little push to see that you are not alone and that you can do it.  Peer groups can and do play an important support role for those with diabetes.  We invite you to join us for the next session of Control Diabetes for Life on Monday June 8.  Control Diabetes for Life can become your peer/support group.

 

Science agrees that peers can help one another cope with a disease.  Research has found empathetic support also improves overall mental health and quality of life, reduces depression and anxiety, and boosts problem-solving abilities.  Peer support empowers people with chronic diseases to take steps toward improving their own health.  People are influenced by peers to take on the behaviors by their peers to take on the behaviors they should.  “If your doctor tells you that you have to walk 150 minutes a week that seems like a pretty steep order.  But if a friend tells you that they walk 150 to 200 minutes a week, that makes you feel like you can also make and complete such a commitment.

 

Much research on peer support have involved people with diabetes and the findings are significant.  According to a recent report by the National Peer Support Collaborative Learning Network, of 20 studies on peer support and diabetes published between 2000 and 2012, all but one found social support to be beneficial.

 

Fitting diabetes into your lifestyle is the key message today. Diabetes does not have to dictate how you live.  University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension and Franciscan Care Services invite you and your family members to participate in a new and exciting diabetes educational program. The series of programs is being offered via two-way interactive distance education. Participants will learn about current issues related to diabetes from educators with over 25 years of team-teaching experience.

 

Monday, June 8, is the second of three programs in the 2015 Control Diabetes for Life series. Topics that will be addressed during the two-hour program are: Healthy Coaches Here to Help You; Summertime Snack Fun; and Food Safety for Those with Diabetes along with other helpful hints. Participants will sample a new recipe for a diabetic appropriate food. Team-teaching the program will be Deborah Willcox, R.D., L.M.N.T., and Stacie Petersen, B.S.N. and Certified Diabetes Educator both of Franciscan Care Services in West Point and Debra Schroeder, UNL Extension Educator in Cuming County.

 

Participants have the opportunity to attend the program from 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the distance learning classroom at the Tekamah Herman Public High School.

“Control Diabetes for Life” is a joint project of University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension, Franciscan Care Services of West Point and the schools hosting the presentation. The program is offered free-of-charge. “Control Diabetes for Life” will help participants learn to control diabetes and prolong the onset of complications from the disease. These sessions are designed to supplement the education that you receive from your local diabetes education team and are not a substitute for diabetes classes through your local health care providers.

Participants are asked to pre-register for “Control Your Diabetes for Life” by calling the Nebraska Extension office in Burt County at 402/374-2929. Please register by Friday, June 5, so the proper number of handouts may be prepared. Nebraska School Food Service Association has approved this session for two hours of continuing education credits for food service staff attending.

 

Control your diabetes for life!  Start by attending the June 8 distance education program.  Call today to register!

 

 

Mary Loftis,

Extension Assistant
UNL Extension – Burt County
111 North 13th Street, Suite 6
Tekamah, NE 68061
Phone: (402) 374-2929

Fax: (402) 374-2930

Internet: mloftis2@unl.edu

Learning the Latest Information on Diabetes


Despite daunting data, many cases of diabetes are preventable and controllable.  With the right knowledge and healthful habits, people can significantly reduce their risk. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than26 million people in the United States currently live with diabetes.  If trends continue, the condition will affect more than one-third of Americans by 2050.  We invite you to attend Control Diabetes for Life on Monday November 10 to learn the latest information related to diabetes and refine your healthful habits.

 

Yes, we have come a long way since we first began working in the field of diabetes education. We now know that the complications associated with diabetes can be prevented or delayed. Plus our growing knowledge of various foods and their effect on blood sugar levels enables people with diabetes to eat food they like, choose when and how much to eat and still control blood-sugar levels.

 

It is the best time in history to have diabetes, especially in light of the difficulties our parents and grandparents would encounter had they been diagnosed decades ago. Today people with diabetes can choose from a wide variety of non-nutritive sweeteners and can even figure out how to fit sugar-containing foods into your meal plan. With carbohydrate information now readily available for most foods, diabetics can easily learn to count carbohydrates at each meal. This allows diabetics to fit virtually any food into your meal plan.

 

Fitting diabetes into your life style is the key message today. Diabetes does not have to dictate how you live.  If it has been a year or more since you last participated in a diabetes education session now is the time to make it a priority to updates your knowledge and skills so you can care for yourself and your family.

 

University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension and Franciscan Care Services invite you and your family members to participate in a new and exciting diabetes educational program. The series of programs is being offered via the two-way interactive distance education facilities. Participants will learn about current issues related to diabetes from educators with over 20 years of team-teaching experience with the in-depth Living with Diabetes series.

 

Monday, November 10, is the third of three programs in “Control Diabetes for Life” series. Topics that will be addressed during the two-hour program are:  “The Latest in Diabetes Research”; “Types of Diabetes”; “Carb Counting Refresher focusing on Combination Foods”; and “Making Peace with the Food Cops” along with other helpful hints. Participants will sample a new recipe for a diabetic appropriate food. Team-teaching the program will be Deborah Willcox, R.D. and L.M.N.T., and Stacie Petersen, B.S.N. and Certified Diabetes Educator both of Franciscan Care Services in West Point and Debra Schroeder, UNL Extension Educator in Cuming County.

 

Participants have the opportunity to attend the program on Monday, November 10, from 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Tekamah Herman high school distance education room.

“Control Diabetes for Life” is a joint project of University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension, Franciscan Care Services of West Point and the schools hosting the presentation. The program is offered free-of-charge. “Control Diabetes for Life” will help participants learn to control diabetes and prolong the onset of complications from the disease. These sessions are designed to supplement the education that you receive from your local diabetes health care team and not a substitute for diabetes classes through your local health care providers.

Participants are asked to pre-register for “Control Your Diabetes for Life” by calling the UNL Extension Office in Burt County at 402-374-2929. Please register by Friday, November 7, so the proper number of handouts may be prepared.  When registering please indicate which location and the time of that session.  Nebraska School Food Service Association has approved this session for two hours of continuing education credits for food service staff for attending.

 

Control your diabetes for life!  Start by attending the November 10 distance education program.  Call today to register!

 

 

Mary Loftis,

Extension Assistant
UNL Extension – Burt County
111 North 13th Street, Suite 6
Tekamah, NE 68061
Phone: (402) 374-2929

Fax: (402) 374-2930

Internet: mloftis2@unl.edu

Diabetes Awareness Month


“Make sure to eat lots of fruits and vegetables, see your physician often and drink lots of water,” stated Connie Peterson, recommendations she takes to heart on the subject of type 2 diabetes.

Approximately 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012.

“I got type 2 diabetes when I was pregnant with Cody. They called this gestational diabetes, which I have had since February of 1988,” Connie said. “I take Metformin twice a day and an insulin shot called Humalog before each meal. I also take an insulin shot called lantus before bedtime. This is a slow acting shot to help me throughout the night.”

Connie is on a sliding scale. “This is according to what your sugars run when checked before each meal. I check mine four times a day. Each persons’ sugars run differently,” Connie stated. 85 makes me feel low, which consists of shakiness and feeling jittery. 170 is high for me, which may make me extra thirsty or sleepy. Some have to urinate a lot.”

Sugars used to be the only thing people really watched, but that is no longer true. “Now you need to count carbohydrates, 45 grams for breakfast, 15 grams for a snack, 45 grams for lunch, 15 for a snack, 45 grams for supper and 15 for a snack before going to bed,” Connie said. “The one before bed is only if you need it.”

There is another measures recommended to control diabetes. “Exercise is very important. Walking is especially good,” Connie said.

As time has progressed, Connie has had to deal with many health changes as a result of her diabetes. “At this time in my life, I am dealing with a lot of pain in my feet, toes and legs. This is called neuropathy,” Connie stated. Her family has a history of diabetes. “My dad was a diabetic. He had a large family and I believe every one of them had it in some form or other,” Connie said. “I had an aunt that went blind and had several other problems. My brother and sister also have been diagnosed with diabetes.”

People with diabetes are at a higher risk of major health complications. “There are horrible side effects from having diabetes. Loss of limbs, blindness and diabetic ulcers are a few,” Connie stated.

Monitoring your health is very important to prevent diabetes from deteriorating your health. “I have blood your done every three months. You need to see your physician regularly, more often if there are complications,” Connie said.

For more information about diabetes, contact your physician or visit the National Diabetes Prevention Program at www.cdc.gov/diabetes.

Connie with her granddaughter Kalihan. Photo Courtesy of Connie Peterson.

Connie with her granddaughter Kalihan. Photo Courtesy of Connie Peterson.

Exercise and the Treatment of Diabetes


Have you ever thought that someday you might be unable to walk and enjoy the simple pleasures of life?  If so, it is time that you begin to reduce the chance of not being able to perform activities of daily living by beginning an exercise program.  Exercise can be a powerful tool in an individual’s health program and has been shown to improve a person’s quality of life.  Regular exercise can improve your chances of being able to continue to perform those activities that your enjoy.

 

Today exercise is indicated in the treatment of a large number of medical problems and is considered by some as the “wonder drug of our time”.  Evidence suggests, in selected cases, that exercise can be as effective as medical treatment, and in special situations more effective.  Being active protects against heart disease, cancer, stroke and helps the body in controlling blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugars.  Exercise can also lessen the effects of arthritis, improve bone strength, reduce falls, and decrease the stress associated with everyday life.

 

For individuals with diabetes regular exercise has been shown to lower their blood glucose levels, and can decrease blood glucose for several hours following exercise.   Decreasing your blood sugars by 1% can reduces your chance of heart attacks by 15-20%.  Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease your life expectancy by 8-10 years.  Participating in a regular exercise program can improve your quality of life and improve your life expectancy.

 

If you have just been diagnosed and wonder how you’ll get in shape, or if you have had diabetes for a long time but still want to be more active, there is no time like the present.  Don’t use diabetes as an excuse to not exercise.  Use it as an excuse to exercise!

 

During the November 10 session of “Control Diabetes for Life” we invite you to learn for about how exercise can change your life.  The program will help you get started with your exercise program by providing instructions on  who can exercise, general rules about exercise, what type of exercise should you perform , how much exercise is enough, how often you should perform of an exercise program and how you can get started.   The goal of exercise is to improve a person’s quality of life by decreasing the presence and the effects of disease. Set a goal to take control of your diabetes.  Feel better and stay healthy for years to come by exercising and lowering your blood glucose level.

The program “Control of Diabetes for Life” will be held on Monday November 10 from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. at the Tekamah Herman High School.

“Control Diabetes for Life”, is a program to help participants learn to control diabetes and delay the onset of complications. The program is a joint project, sponsored by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension, Franciscan Care Services of West Point and cooperating schools, and is offered free-of-charge.

Participants are asked to pre-register for “Control Your Diabetes for Life” by calling the Burt County Extension office at 402-374-2929. Please register by Friday November 7, 2014 so the proper number of handouts may be prepared. Nebraska School Food Service Association has approved this session for two hours of continuing education credits for food service staff for attending.

Control of your diabetes for life! Start by attending the November 10 distance education program. Call today to register!

 

 

Mary Loftis,

Extension Assistant
UNL Extension – Burt County
111 North 13th Street, Suite 6
Tekamah, NE 68061
Phone: (402) 374-2929

Fax: (402) 374-2930

Internet: mloftis2@unl.edu

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