Soybean Aphid Scouting and Management


By John Wilson, Extension Educator  

Soybean aphids have been found in recent field surveys in northeast Nebraska. I checked a few local fields and found an occasional plant with a few (less than 10) aphids/plant. These numbers are extremely low, which is typical for this time of year, but it does signal it’s time to start scouting.

Aphids will be found on the newest leaves at the top of the plant first. Ths indicates they recently colonized the plant, probably within the last week. The good news is the soybean aphid’s natural enemies have also been found in these field surveys, so they may hold the populations in check, or at least slow their population growth.

Relatively mild weather, between 70 and 85F, favors soybean aphid development, so make sure to check fields at least once a week. Soybean aphid population growth can be quite rapid, and regular monitoring of soybean aphid populations is key to effective management.

Soybean Aphid Description

The soybean aphid is soft bodied, light green to pale yellow, less than 1/16 inch long, and has two black-tipped cornicles, or tailpipes, on the rear of the abdomen. It has piercing-sucking mouthparts and typically feeds on new tissue on the undersides of leaves near the top of recently colonized soybean plants. Later in the season the aphids can be found on all parts of the plant, feeding primarily on the undersides of leaves, but also on the stems and pods.

Soybean Aphid Injury to Soybean

Soybean aphids injure soybeans by sucking out plant sap with their needle-like mouthparts. Symptoms of soybeans infested by soybean aphid may include yellowed, distorted leaves and stunted plants. A charcoal-colored residue also may be present on the plants. This is sooty mold that grows on the honeydew that aphids excrete. Honeydew by itself makes leaves appear shiny. Soybean plants appear to be most vulnerable to aphid injury during the early reproductive stages.

Aphid Scouting Methods

The economic threshold for late vegetative through R5, or pod fill, stage soybeans is 250 aphids per plant with 80% of the plants infested and populations increasing. Begin scouting soybean fields once or twice a week now. Check 20 to 30 randomly selected plants in various areas of each field.

Aphids are most likely to concentrate at the very top of the plant, although they will move onto stems and within the canopy as populations grow and/or the plant reaches mid to late reproductive stages. If a tree line or woodlot is adjacent to the soybean field, make sure and include a few sampling locations near these areas. Soybean aphids are often found first in the parts of soybean fields near wooded areas.

Counting aphids is not as difficult as it may at first seem. First, walk to a random spot in the field. Pull a plant and turn it upside down and give it a quick scan to see where the aphids are located. Get a feel for what 10 or 20 aphids look like and count by 10s or 20s.

The current threshold for late vegetative through R5 stage soybean is 250 aphids/plant with 80% of the plants infested and populations increasing. Thresholds for early R6 have yet to be determined, but are likely in the 400-500 aphids/plant range. Insecticide treatment done during or after mid-late R6 has not been documented to increase yield.

Soybean Aphid Management

Look for the presence of aphid natural enemies such as lady beetles, green lacewings, insidious flower bugs, aphid mummies, fuzzy aphids, and other insect predators. Predators and parasitoids may keep low or moderate aphid populations in check. One can often find soybean aphids by examining plants where lady beetles are observed.

Note whether the plants are covered with honeydew or sooty mold, or stunted, and aphids are still present at threshold levels. An insecticide treatment may still be of value but the optimum time for treatment has passed.

Good insecticide coverage and penetration is required for optimal control of soybean aphid because aphids feed on the undersides of the leaves and within the canopy. For ground application use high water volume (15 gallons/acre) and pressure (30 psi). Aerial application works well when high water volume is used (3 gallons/acre).

Several insecticides are labeled for the soybean aphid. Pyrethroids have a relatively long residual, and work best at temperatures below 90ºF. Organophosphates have a fuming action, and may work well in heavy canopies or high temperatures. Dimethoate is least effective.

Soybean aphids, if they reach economic thresholds, usually do so and require treatment in late July through August. One treatment during this period usually is enough to keep aphid populations from resurging because there is not enough time for populations to build-up before they would naturally leave the fields in late August and early September. The earlier a field is treated, the greater the chance that any surviving aphids can later reproduce or new aphids can repopulate the field.

Remember, insecticide treatment also kills many natural enemies, so any aphids that do re-infest a field are not constrained by predators and other natural controls. Even insecticides with a relatively long residual cannot last when insecticide treatment is done in early or mid-July, particularly during a year when aphid populations are thriving. If one has to treat early, make sure to closely monitor the field until early September.

Another practice that can result in aphid population resurgence is unwarranted insecticide treatment, either because fields were treated well before the threshold was met or fields were treated along with a herbicide (in some cases a fungicide), regardless of aphid presence. These treatments kill natural enemies and are usually done relatively early so there is plenty of time for aphids to resurge, or re-colonize a field.

Aphid populations below or even at the economic threshold do not cause yield loss, so treating before populations reach 250 aphids/plant only increases the probability of aphid resurgence. In addition, we have observed that many fields support a non-increasing, low population of aphids (e.g., less than 100 aphids/plant) through August. Treating these fields would be a waste of time and money.

Tank-mixing insecticides with glyphosate or other herbicides can be problematic because application methods for herbicides (e.g., lower pressures, large droplet producing nozzles) are not optimal for good insecticide efficacy. Tank-mixing with fungicides can be effective because application methods for fungicides and insecticides require high water pressure for adequate penetration and coverage, however, only conduct this practice IF soybean aphid thresholds are met.

Purchase Pavers from Burt County Ag Society


The Burt County Ag Society is creating a granite paver patio for the new windmill and grill to set on.

You are invited to use this means to honor, memorialize or just support these projects and the Burt County Ag. Society.

Sizes range from 8”x8”  and 8”x16” to 16”x16”. Pavers need to be ordered by June 5 to be on display for the 2015 fair.

Contact the Burt County Ag Society at 402-685-5540 or the Nebraska Extension Office in Burt County at 402-374-2929 for more details and an order form.

 

Mary Loftis,

Extension Assistant
UNL Extension – Burt County
111 North 13th Street, Suite 6
Tekamah, NE 68061
Phone: (402) 374-2929

Fax: (402) 374-2930

Internet: mloftis2@unl.edu

Babysitting Clinic Held


Deputy Sheriff, Eric Nick discussed safety issues at the Babysitting Clinic including when to call 911 with 30 participants last week in Tekamah. This three session workshop drew participants from Lyons, Decatur, Tekamah and Herman.  Photo Credit/Mary Loftis.

Deputy Sheriff, Eric Nick discussed safety issues at the Babysitting Clinic including when to call 911 with 30 participants last week in Tekamah.
This three session workshop drew participants from Lyons, Decatur, Tekamah and Herman.
Photo Credit/Mary Loftis.

Don’t Let it Go!


Don’t let your opportunity to attend the “Frozen” 4-H achievement event go without at least putting up a good snowball fight! This fun and rewarding event is this Sunday, January 11 at the Oakland Auditorium, but we need to hear from you by Friday, January 9 so we have enough pizza! Call the Extension office (374-2929) to let us know how many from your family are planning to attend.

The afternoon will begin at 4:00 p.m. with FROZEN Fun Family Activities! We’ll have a snowman building contest (inside), have “snowball fights” and a multitude of frozen fun activities. At 4:45 we will give out 4-H Member & Leader Awards followed by a 5:30 pizza dinner. Everyone is invited to attend and a list of 4-H members and leaders who will be receiving awards went out with the 4-H newsletter. If you and your family would like to check out the Burt County 4-H program, please plan to attend, we’d love to have you join in on the fun.

 

Burt County 4-H FFA Market Beef Weigh Day

Saturday, January 24 is the date for the Burt County Market Beef weighing. Johnnie Johnson will again host the event in his HEATED barn area on the farm at 1340 County Road E, Craig, NE. Weighing will be done from 8:30-11:00 a.m. DNA sampling will again be done again if you wish to show at State Fair and/or Ak-Sar-Ben. The cost will be $6.00 per sample. Ak-Sar-Ben exhibitors will have the opportunity to show their market animal in a “Breed” class as specified in the premium book. When DNA is being collected this breed information needs to be documented on the DNA envelope. This should go on the line that has “Calving Date” under it. This information is only needed if the exhibitor is interested in showing their animal in a breed class.

If you cannot make the Burt County Weigh Day please call the Extension Office at 402-374-2929 to find alternate dates in other counties.

 

Burt County Fair Foundation Kickoff Event

The Burt County Fair Foundation will again host a Fair Kickoff/Fundraiser Event using the theme “Forever in Blue Jeans.” The event will be Saturday, February 28 and it will be held in the Tekamah Auditorium. Tickets are now on sale at the Extension office in Burt County and many local banks! Get yours now so you don’t miss out on the fun!

 

Auction Items Needed for Silent Auction

4-H Clubs, 4-H members and anyone else is invited to contribute items for the Burt County Fair Foundation Kickoff’s Silent Auction on February 28th. Check your treasury, take up a collection, or just see what you’d like to make or contribute!

If you’re a budding entrepreneur or an established business this could be a great way to get your business noticed by people across the county.

Gift certificates, craft items, business vouchers, you name it and it can be donated. If you need ideas or you have a larger valued item to donate for the live auction you can contact Burt County Fair Foundation President, Jason Penke at 402-377-1657 or Mary Loftis at the Extension Office at 402-374-2929 for more information or to drop off an item.

 

 

Mary Loftis,

Extension Assistant
UNL Extension – Burt County
111 North 13th Street, Suite 6
Tekamah, NE 68061
Phone: (402) 374-2929

Fax: (402) 374-2930

Internet: mloftis2@unl.edu

Mary Loftis

Mary Loftis

Bohannon Attends National 4-H Congress


Nick Bohannon of Tekamah attended the National 4-H Congress right after Thanksgiving representing Burt County and Nebraska 4-H at this prestigious event. Here is a quick summation of this event through his eyes:

I recently returned from National 4-H Congress in Atlanta, Georgia. I was part of Nebraska’s 25 delegates, none of which I knew prior to arriving at Eppley Airfield in Omaha.
Early on Black Friday we departed for our 5 day conference. Coming back that next Tuesday was one of the most disappointing trips home I have ever had to take.  After networking with outstanding individuals from 46 states and Puerto Rico on this trip of a lifetime, coming home was kind of a downer.
Throughout the conference week we were able to listen to many fantastic inspirational speakers within the walls of Atlanta’s beautiful Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center. We had many cultural events in which we were exposed to foods, dances, and other elements of life that we may never have experienced. For example, at the Atlanta History Center we had the opportunity to watch native African dancers perform and even learn the significance of certain actions within the dance.
Monday morning we did community service work at a city park in downtown Atlanta. In the 250+ acre park in the heart of the city we were able to help the grounds crew clean leaves and prepare for winter.
Additionally, we were able to attend many sessions presented by extension specialists from universities across the country during our time at Congress.
I will never forget the “Give, Talk, Learn” session about the value of service learning projects. These community service projects affect people in ways we could never begin to understand. During the session, Mr. Justin Crowe from the University of Tennessee Extension
told a story about his most memorable service project as an extension agent. Mr. Crowe had
been administering a science fair in a Memphis, Tennessee school district for 4th and 5th
graders. When a young 4th grade girl received 2nd place she was overjoyed to the point where
Mr. Crowe wondered why. Why was this girl so happy? When he spoke with the teacher, he
discovered the little 4th grade girl was homeless. She lived under a bridge a few blocks
from the school and everything she used for her science project had been donated to the local
shelter. That 2nd place 4-H ribbon may have changed that girl’s life in ways most Americans
could never begin to comprehend!
Stories like this remind me daily that every community service project, mentoring program, or 4-H group has a purpose. No matter how minuscule a task may seem, we are changing the lives of someone, regardless of if we see it or not.
Without a doubt 4-H is the best program I have ever had the privilege to be a part of and National 4-H Congress was the trip of a lifetime. I will never forget the memories I have made through 4-H and other community service projects. I encourage everyone reading this to either, get involved, get your kids and grandkids involved, or volunteer today. Keep in mind that anyone can make a difference in the world and 4-H is an outstanding way to begin making your mark.
As the University of Nebraska – Lincoln commercial states “… make waves where there is no ocean …”
Nick Bohannon
2014 National 4-H Congress Delegate

Nick Bohannon

Nick Bohannon


Nicholas Bohannon
UNL Extension – Burt County
Summer Intern
111 North 13th Street
Tekamah, NE 68061
Office: (402)-374-2929
Mobile: (402)-709-3583
nick.bohannon1@gmail.com

Medicare Comparison Held at Oakland Public Library


UNL Extension Assistant assists Delwin and Myrna Swanson at the Oakland Public Library with Medicare comparison. Both photos credit of Denise Gilliland, Editor and Chief, Kat Country Hub.

UNL Extension Assistant assists Delwin and Myrna Swanson at the Oakland Public Library with Medicare comparison. Both photos credit of Denise Gilliland, Editor and Chief, Kat Country Hub.

DSC05962

Medicare and Confusion


It’s a confusing time for Medicare recipients. They need to wear sunglasses to protect their eyes from the sun, then they go inside and have to turn on more lights to see. They are told to wear ear plugs to protect their hearing, then need hearing aids in order to hear!

No wonder people are confused when it comes to Medicare…they turned 65 and think they have their insurance figured out because they now qualify for Medicare, but no, here is this annual Medicare Open Enrollment that just adds to the confusion.

Don’t dismay…the Senior Health Insurance Information Program (SHIIP) is on its way to ease your confusion and help you make the best use of your health dollars.

SHIIP is part of the Nebraska Department of Insurance and its purpose is to help senior citizens understand the entire Medicare program and offer help comparing and enrolling in different parts of Medicare.

Open Enrollment is from October 15 through December 7 each year. During this time current Medicare recipients may make changes to their health and/or drug plans.

Some Medicare recipients are still working and are covered by their employers insurance. In that case, if they already have prescription drug coverage as good as or better than what Medicare offers they don’t need to do anything until they retire from their job.

Many other Medicare recipients need to take this annual Open Enrollment opportunity to check their health and drug coverage (if they are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan) or just their drug coverage if they have Original Medicare Part A & B, with a supplement.

You won’t know if you could have saved money if you don’t check your prescriptions against the 2015 Medicare Prescription Drug Plans and there are 30 of them to compare against! How can you possibly compare with that many? The easiest way is to call your local University of Nebraska Extension Office and make an appointment to meet with a SHIIP volunteer. These are trained volunteers who are only looking out for you, not any pharmacy, drug or insurance company.

Open Enrollment sessions are scheduled in Fremont this Thursday and Friday, October 23 & 24 from 9:00am-3:00pm at the UNL Extension Office at 1206 West 23rd Street. An enrollment event will also be held in the North Bend Public Library on Thursday, November 6. Call 402-727-2775 for an appointment at either of these Dodge County locations.

Other Medicare comparison events are scheduled in Blair, November 17 and 18 at the UNL Extension office in Washington County at 597 Grant Street. Call 402-426-9455 for an appointment time.

Many Medicare Open Enrollment Events are scheduled in Burt County. To find a date and location that fits your needs call the UNL Extension Office in Burt County at 402-374-2929. Sessions are planned in Craig, Oakland, Lyons, Decatur and Tekamah.

Anyone living anywhere is welcome at any of these events, just call to make an appointment so we have enough computers and volunteers to help.

End your Medicare confusion by attending a Medicare Open Enrollment Comparison Event and make sure you’re not spending more on your prescriptions and/or health care than absolutely necessary.

 

 

Mary Loftis,

Extension Assistant
UNL Extension – Burt County
111 North 13th Street, Suite 6
Tekamah, NE 68061
Phone: (402) 374-2929

Fax: (402) 374-2930

Internet: mloftis2@unl.edu

Mary Loftis

Mary Loftis

Medicare Near Miss


Have you ever had a “near miss”? You know, the kind of thing that happens in a blink of an eye that sends your heart beating wildly and sometimes causes goose bumps? According to Wikipedia “A near miss is an unplanned event that did not result in injury, illness, or damage – but had the potential to do so. Only a fortunate break in the chain of events prevented an injury, fatality or damage.”

Many of us recently experienced a near miss…whether you knew it or not. Many of you are aware of the work I’ve been doing with the Medicare program for the past 10 years…ever since the Medicare Prescription Drug Plan started.

Since that time I personally have worked with over 1900 people helping them understand the Medicare program and compare all the Medicare Prescription Drug Plans to their particular prescriptions in order to get the best plan to cover their needs for the least money. Over those years I have helped these individuals save over half a million dollars! Additionally though the assistance of other SHIIP volunteers at events I have planned the grand total of savings is almost $660,000!

Despite the huge financial impact being made, the grant funding for the support of UNL Extension offering this program has been declining in recent years. The near miss came about recently when the announcement was made stating Extension personnel would not be working with the Medicare program in 2015.

Those of us in Extension were very upset.  This was such an important program showing such valuable impact not only saving people money, but offering peace of mind and education on these complex programs. We set about working to make sure the Extension decision makers knew how very much we were needed in rural Nebraska to help people make intelligent and well informed decisions about their medical and prescription needs. After a few weeks of emails, conversations and support from communities across the state we received notice the decision to pull Extension out of the Medicare program has been reversed!

This was truly a near miss not only for my programming, but for all the people in the state and especially the 3 county area I serve as an Extension and SHIIP Medicare contact.

Now it’s time to make sure you don’t have a near miss experience with your Medicare Prescription Drug or Health Plan. Make an appointment to attend one of the 19 Medicare Open Enrollment events available in Burt, Dodge and Washington Counties before the December 7 enrollment deadline.

 

These are free – no pressure events and NOTHING will be sold. Just make an appointment for the most convenient time and location on one of the event dates; bring your list of prescription medications and relax and take comfort in knowing you did everything you could to compare and save money on prescriptions for next year. Anyone from any county may attend any of these Open Enrollment Events. I hope to see you there!

 

In Burt County call UNL Extension in Burt County at 402-374-2929 for an appointment:

October 15 – Wednesday – Tekamah – UNL Extension Office, 111 North 13th Street, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 pm

October 20 – Monday – Tekamah – Orville and Willa Chatt Senior Center – 1124 S. 13th Street, 9:00 am-8:00 pm

 

October 21 – Tuesday – Decatur –Sears Senior Center – 8th and Broadway, 9:00 am-4:00 p.m.

October 22 – Wednesday – Tekamah – Tekamah-Herman Computer Classroom #106 – 112 N. 13th Street, 3:30-5:30 p.m.

November 3 – Monday – Lyons – Lyons Public Library, 305 Main St., 9:00-Noon.

November 3 – Monday – Decatur – Sears Senior Center, 8th and Broadway, 1:00-5:00 p.m.

November 4 – Tuesday – Oakland -Oakland Public Library, 110 East 3rd Street, 8:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

November 4 – Tuesday – Tekamah – Tekamah-Herman Computer Classroom #106 – 112 N. 13th Street, 3:30-5:30 p.m.

November 5 – Friday – Lyons – Lyons Public Library, 305 Main St., 9:00-Noon.

November 5 – Tuesday – Oakland – Oakland Public Library, 110 East 3rd Street, 1:30-5:00 p.m.

November 7 – Friday – Lyons – Lyons Public Library, 305 Main St., 9:00 a.m.-Noon.

November 10 – Monday – Craig – Craig Fire Hall – 333 Main Street, 8:30 am-4:0 pm

 

November 20 – Thursday – Tekamah – Orville and Willa Chatt Senior Center – 1124 S. 13th Street,

9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.

November 24 – Monday – Tekamah – Orville and Willa Chatt Senior Center – 1124 S. 13th Street,

9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.

 

In Washington County call UNL Extension in Washington County at 402-426-9455 for an appointment.

November 17 – Monday – Blair – Washington County Extension Office, 597 Grant St., 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 pm

November 18 – Tuesday – Blair – Washington County Extension Office, 597 Grant St. 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

 

In Dodge County Call UNL Extension in Dodge County at 402-727-2775 for an appointment:

October 23 –Thursday– Fremont – Dodge County Extension Office, 1206 W. 23rd St. 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

October 24 – Friday – Fremont – Dodge County Extension Office, 1206 W. 23rd Street, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

November 6 – Thursday – North Bend – 110 E 13th St. North Bend, NE Heritage Room 1:00-5:00 pm

 

 

 

Mary Loftis,

Extension Assistant
UNL Extension – Burt County
111 North 13th Street, Suite 6
Tekamah, NE 68061
Phone: (402) 374-2929

Fax: (402) 374-2930

Internet: mloftis2@unl.edu

Volunteer at the State Fair


J

Mary Loftis

Mary Loftis

oin the Fun at the State Fair as a Volunteer!

The Nebraska 4-H program is seeking volunteers to help with exhibit entry day, judging, and serving as 4-H exhibit building hosts and greeters. Volunteers will be needed for educational activities in the 4-H building, serving as the Lil’ Green Mascot and assisting with all 4-H contests and events throughout the fair. State Fair 4-H volunteers will receive a fair pass for the day(s) they volunteer. They are looking for volunteers, parents, teens, anyone familiar with the 4-H program who will donate a little time to support 4-H.

Volunteers can sign-up by visiting http://4h.unl.edu/becomevolunteer or by contacting the Burt County extension office. A complete list of volunteer opportunities is also available on the site. If you have questions about being a 4-H volunteer at the Nebraska State Fair, please contact Cathy Johnston, Extension Educator, at (402) 472-1762 orcjohnston1@unl.edu.

 

Centennial Open House at the State Fair

Join the fun in Grand Island on Saturday, August 30 in the brand new Raising Nebraska Building. UNL Extension will host its final celebration of the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Smith Lever Act which provided the establishment of the Extension program nationwide.

The big event will be from 1:00-5:00 p.m. with demonstrations and activities on two stages. There are also additional activities like a Scavenger Hunt and the opportunity to tape an extension testimonial (see bottom of column for extra details on these events.)

Extension Demonstrations and Activities on the Kitchen Stage

1:00 pm Cooking with Local Products

UNL Extension Food & Nutrition Team

1:30 pm 4-H Commodity Carnival: Risk Ranch

UNL Extension 4-H Youth Development Program

2:00 pm Cooking with Local Products

UNL Extension Food & Nutrition Team

3:00 pm Ice Cream Social

UNL Extension

4:00 pm Blender Bike Bonanza

UNL Extension 4-H Youth Development Program

Extension Demonstrations and Activities on the Presentation Stage

1:00 pm Do you want to be a Millionaire?

UNL Extension Community Vitality Initiative

2:00 pm Raising Nebraska Landscaping Preview

UNL Extension Water, Environment, and Community Team

2:30 pm Centennial Celebration Presentation

UNL Extension

3:00 pm Raising Nebraska Landscaping Walkthrough

UNL Extension Water, Environment, and Community Team

3:30 pm Nebraska’s Biggest Storytime

UNL Extension Learning Child Team & NET Kids powered by a Ready To Grant

4:00 pm Whisper Stethoscope

Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center

4:30 pm Automated Weather Data Network

High Plains Regional Climate Center

 

Scavenger Hunt

As part of our centennial celebration at the state fair, we are conducting a centennial emblem scavenger hunt. Several centennial emblems will be hidden across the state fair grounds. If you find one, just tweet a selfie with the emblem to #ext100 and be entered to win some UNL swag.

Testimonial Taping

During the Open House in the Conversation Pit, we will be collecting testimonials from Nebraskans on the impact that UNL Extension has had on their lives. We are asking volunteers to give us just 20-30 seconds of their time in front of the camera.

These testimonials will then be combined and made into a short video.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Loftis,

Extension Assistant
UNL Extension – Burt County
111 North 13th Street, Suite 6
Tekamah, NE 68061
Phone: (402) 374-2929

Fax: (402) 374-2930

Internet: mloftis2@unl.edu

4-H Adventure Day Camp


By Mary Loftis, Extension Assistant

UNL Extension in Burt and Cuming County joined together to host the 4-H Adventure Day Camp in Neligh Park in West Point Thursday, June 5.

34 Campers had the opportunity to get a taste of what a true 4-H camp can be during this day camp experience. Ten teen counselors from both counties helped supervise the campers, assisted with workshops, played games and in general, made the camp memorable for the participants. Behind the scenes the Cuming County Adventure Day Camp Committee worked to provide meals, snacks and help with activities.

Adventures awaiting the campers included workshops on:

Electrical Safety, presented by Nikki White of the Cuming County Public Power District;

Leaf Printing presented by UNL Extension Assistant, Kelli Lechtenberg;

Building a Bird House and Wildlife Tracks sessions led by UNL Extension Educator, Debra Schroeder and Sarah Herzinger.

Food Science Activities and making Homemade Ice Cream in a Bag sessions led by UNL Extension Assistant, Mary Loftis;

Introduction to Entomology presented by Erin Ingram and Ivy Orellano of the UNL Department of Entomology and canoeing which was led by Cory Krause, Conservation Officer of the Nebraska Game and Parks.

It was a full day of fun and education for everyone involved and hopefully the campers will decide to attend one of the many multiple day camps offered at the Nebraska 4-H Camps near Gretna and Halsey, NE. If you’d like more information on these camps (4-H membership is not a requirement to attend) please call the UNL Extension Office at 402-374-2929 or go to the Nebraska 4-H Camp website at: http://4h.unl.edu/4hcamps

Part of the Food Science workshop at the Adventure Day Camp found these 4-H members experiencing inertia and gravity. Madison Mandel, Reese Hansen and Sami Linder watching the eggs experience gravity and drop safely in the glass of water after they provided the unbalanced force to change inertia (hitting) the pie tin and toilet paper tube out from underneath them. Photo Credit/Mary Loftis, Extension Assistant.

Part of the Food Science workshop at the Adventure Day Camp found these 4-H members experiencing inertia and gravity. Madison Mandel, Reese Hansen and Sami Linder watching the eggs experience gravity and drop safely in the glass of water after they provided the unbalanced force to change inertia (hitting) the pie tin and toilet paper tube out from underneath them. Photo Credit/Mary Loftis, Extension Assistant.

Alex Davis of Tekamah gets help from Jordan Fullner as she makes a bird house at the 4-H Adventure Camp.  Photo Credit/Mary Loftis, Extension Assistant.

Alex Davis of Tekamah gets help from Jordan Fullner as she makes a bird house at the 4-H Adventure Camp.
Photo Credit/Mary Loftis, Extension Assistant.

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